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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)
and government will find "patriots debate" worth their time. thank you all for coming. i would like to thank our authors or contributed essays and to a get to debate these topics extemporaneously in public square. the structure, the first hour will be conducting the debates on a relatively formal basis. first several war and then we can put questions and the note cards on your seat spirit of will take the committee for the event and turn things back over to my friend and co-editor. >> a living example of will we love to see which is that someone interested in national security law is undergraduate and the committee that will produce documents better able to be used for teaching purposes and then we hope one day we will end up in law school perhaps with an attorney. thank you for everything you've done. the logic, the framework as follows, the first part of the book deals with the war on terrorism demand utility second power which has a debate. homegrown terrorism which is a debate. in the interrogation issue which is a debate for abrams. and been moved to an area we thought, part two, very big i
-fire between government and rebel forces.o >> there are many other organizations that do medical care and food provisions. never enough. what is new here is civilians protecting civilians. >> ifill: itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. >> we'll hock the person to buy our bread. if you believe the headlines, then we're sunk. greece downgraded deeper into junk. >> ifill: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour.n >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by the bill and melinda gates foundation. dedicated to the idea that all people deserve the chance to live a healthy, productive life. >> and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... >> this program was made possible by the corporation for public broadcasting. and by contributions to your pbs station from viewers like you. thank you. >> ifill: much
profiles a group of peacekeepers struggling to maintain a fragile cease-fire between government and rebel forces. itn's john sparks reports on police officers in china, and their accusations of widespread corruption by local officials. and jeffrey brown samples the poetry about greece's financial woes and its austerity measures. that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: the election commission in egypt confirmed today the new constitution won nearly 64% of the vote in a referendum. the panel also reported turnout was just a third of the country's 52 million registered voters. president mohammed morsi and his muslim brotherhood backed the draft constitution. opponents warned it paves the way for islamic rule and curbs on civil liberties. the six persian gulf arab nations demanded an end to what they called iranian interference. they issued a statement today at the end of the gulf cooperation council's annual summit. the statement gave no details. the six u.s. allied countries, also called for swift international action to end the bl
of sunnis staged mass protests against the shi-ite-led government. there were rallies in fallujah and ramadi, where protests already had erupted earlier this week. today, mosul, tikrit and samarra had demonstrations as well. protesters took to the streets waving flags and signs. they chanted slogans demanding fair treatment from the baghdad regime, and the release of sunni prisoners. shi-ite prime minister nouri al-maliki said the demonstrations were not acceptable. the government of china imposed tighter controls on internet usage today. now, china's 500 million web users will have to provide their real names when they register for internet service. and providers must delete any web content deemed illegal, and report it to authorities. leading writers and bloggers insisted it's a new way for china's communist leaders to censor their critics. >> ( translated ): since the internet came into china, the chinese government has been repeatedly imposing restrictive measures, such as shielding, blocking and banning. it has even spent billions of dollars to build a firewall against overseas sites.
basically raise money to cover eight days of government spending, but you know, david and adam, we've had the letter from nancy pelosi. do you really believe it was a ploy to smoke out the republicans? because nancy pelosi in her letter is equating millionaires to big oil, special interest and corporations. why doesn't the g.o.p. capitalize on that they really want middle class tax hikes when they're talking about raising taxes on the 250,000 plus crowd >> well, i think speaker boehner and the republicans in the house would be able to get some democrats support for the millionaire tax increase which i don't think they did enough of and they had to call off that vote as we all know on that plan. but some democrats would support something like that, but we're talking here about the leadership speaker-- minority leader pelosi and you know, she, because now it's republicans proposing it, now they seem to be backing away. they might be able to get some conservative leaning or moderate democrats to support something like that. and the president, as we know, the white house has signaled they wou
before they went into government. but about the queen and the family and lifting the vail. you thrift veil and this is an extraordinary world we've never seen inside of. so "the queen r queen" came directly from the deal. >> what did tony blair think of it? >> next question. >> i want to know president obama said "homeland" is his favorite show. my question is when you're dealing with live, real people who you are portraying or in the case of "homeland" or "24" when you're trying to deal with agencies that you are representing, what is that interaction like? we were talking a little bit in the room next door, maybe you can answer michael, how is tony blair's perception changed as a result of those films or the queen's perception changed in the minds of the public then we can talk about "homeland" and "24"? >> there are many things that you realize that you are working with when you do a film or a tv show that is -- has so much political emphasis. and one of the things is inevitably you come up against the agenda of people in terms of the agendas they have for looking at and judging po
that the government there was unsustainable because it really did not have a loyalty of the people. and that no matter what we tried to do. it would not have lasted for very long time after we left. afghanistan's i think somewhat different. it's not a matter of one piece of it geographically taking over the other piece. et is a matter of a nation -- it is a matter of a nation that's never really been unified at all tightly. but since then it's become clear that it's not a nation in the ordinary sense. that it's so factionalized that no matter what we do, it's not going to be possible to create the kind of modern state that might become stable and satisfactory from our point of view. under those circumstances, i think the right question is what do we need to do to keep afghanistan from becoming endangered of the united states -- a danger to the united states? the way it is most likely to become a danger to the united states i think is through its influence on pakistan. which to me is the most dangerous place in the world. and i don't think that trying to stabilize the afghan situation by building up tr
originally called in response to set oralism in government, which i prefer -- secularism in government, which are for. a country which invites everyone into it, all religions and nationalities, must by definition be secular. any religious direction we choose is going to favor somebody, and i thought that is what we were trying to avoid. at least i thought that is what jefferson meant when he talked about religious freedoms. host: ok. caller: freedom from religion. host: when you go to vote in a presidential election or congressional election, what are the big factors in your decision? caller: usually economic. i did not consider -- i don't consider religion unless it interferes with some legislation. it plays a very little role in my life. host: would you call yourself unaffiliated religiously? caller: relatively i am an atheist. so, yes, i am unaffiliated. host: here is the "christian science monitor," their cover. the new face of faith. what is happening in new england, the countries most secular region, may have a future of american religion. traditional religions are seeing their ranks th
the government, of the moral condemnation. the answer in the double jeopardy clause it wants. >> starting monday, c-span is featuring supreme court's oral arguments before the war on the bench. all this week it 7:00 eastern time. listen in the baltimore area. for online c-span.org. >> brown university held the discussion about polls were saying before and after the 2012 presidential election. the associate research director explained. he also talked about the future of presidential polling. this is an hour. >> good afternoon, everyone i and the professor of public policy and director here at brown university. i am happy to welcome you to another installment of the speaker series. the luncheon speaker series is one of the of any event. it attempts to inform brown and a larger community about important matters related to government, politics, and public policy. over the years the speaker series has been a wonderful opportunity for the undergraduate students and masters did it a public policy to connect with of foreign- policy thinkers. we're just pleased this afternoon to welcome the associate dir
" to postpone a government default. the government is on track to hit its borrowing limit on monday, he said with no prospect of congressional action to raise the limit. here now to help us unravel what's going on is todd zwillich. he's washington correspondent for "the takeaway" on public radio international. todd, welcome back. decode this for us. are the players privately as bleak about the prospects as their public statement suggests? >> not as bleak, margaret, but bleaker than they were even a week ago and that's not terribly encouraging. the president as you reported is flying back to washington last night and some members of congress are coming back earlier than others. there will be some meetings here, there have to be some meetings between the principals and the president. there are a couple of options in the last couple of days even though it seems like five days is terribly, terribly short. there shall bills floating out there to keep tax rates where they're at for people making $250,000 and below. that could slide around. there's a senate bill that floats around. there's the pres
the cultural revolution. why? he says, because then you knew the government was the enemy, now you're not sure. [laughter] so i said you already want to bring up about a democratic system. they said yes. i'm not a law teacher. so after they say how much they're all favored the market, i said that's a very interesting question, point. i favorite. i favorite, but i've noticed from what i've read that there are millions of people in china who make just a few dollars a day. and they are on the own land and they're not very rich really. and you have quite a lot of money i gather. i was told. and suppose they also look, we are in the majority, and justice money down you. we're going to take it all away from you and give it to us. and the one who started this, i said to you favor that? if that's the result. he said i am in favor of democracy, but maybe not right now. [laughter] so you see, it's like a tiger by the tail. so you start looking at the other side, and they are afraid of a certain kind of chaos or of a certain kind of, and so somehow you have to, you have to, now that, that is partly, that
with the government's first position on guantanamo bay was no-man's land they already rented from cuba the majority was to the extent that the law exists in guantanamo bay. there is no other power, certainly castro is not controlling what was happening there. so, to the government said habeas corpus doesn't extend to guantanamo bay so for that purpose of this part of the usa and a follow on cases in in the lower court so all of the returns are in. >> the next question is 1i know you never get. what is your view of the nomination process that comes from fort lewis and how might it be improved to make it less frustrating were demeaning to? >> it wasn't always the way it has been for the nominations. it would include our chief justice, justice alito, justice so why -- sotomayor and justice kagan. people decided to go along party lines. contrast that with the way that it was when i was nominated in 1993 in the justice breyer the following year. my biggest supporter of the senate judiciary committee was senator orrin hatch and he confirmed that and he wrote an autobiography in which he takes great pride
and democrats don't want to cut funding to government programs. caught in the cross fire of this is all of us. you, me and come tuesday, all of our taxes will go up and here's how it could affect you. if you are living paycheck to paycheck with no room to cut expenses you could be in real trouble if this agreement is not reached. a failure to renew the bush era tax cuts could mean 2 to 4,000 dollars per year in increases for most americans. according to the towson university it breaks down like this. if you make 25,000 dollars a year, your taxes are going up about 42 dollars a month if you make 45k, 75 dollars a month. if you make 65,000, your taxes are going to go up 108 a month and if you make 85,000 a year, you're going to go up 143 dollars a month. that's you and me. think about the super rich. someone like lebron james who make 53 million a year his taxes are going up 2 1/2 million dollars a year alone. as for americans, who are they blaming? a study by roisters shows that a-- reuters shows among the groups blamed 27% say this falls in the laps of republicans 16% say president obama's fa
groups reported a government air strike on a bakery killed at least 60 people. authorities in india restricted vehicle and railroad travel in new delhi today, in the wake of violent protests over a gang rape. on sunday, police sprayed tear gas and water cannons after crowds began throwing stones and tipping over vehicles. the protesters demanded stronger punishments for crimes against women after a 23-year old woman was attacked on a public bus last week. the victim was thrown from the bus afterward. she remains in critical condition. six arrests have been made. washington was quiet today with the president and congress gone for christmas. but the lack of any fiscal cliff talks worried wall street. the dow jones industrial average lost more than 51 points to close at 13,139. the nasdaq fell eight points to close at 3012. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: in egypt, although one side seems to have clearly won, citizens are still awaiting official results of the country's constitutional referendum. as the sun rose over cairo today, opposition activ
in the bay area when the assassinations happened, and wanted to be part of a government that was going to be much more open. in fact, i had to sue the government in order to make it more open. and those years where struggle and just representing people who wanted to make the city much more equality bent was where i felt. and i feel today that if mayor moscone and harvey milk were here, they'd be pretty proud of what we've been able to accomplish in those years. seeing how mayor brown became mayor and my lucky charm of being now the first asian mayor of the city, understanding -- thank you. (applause) >> understanding now that we have the first african-american as president of the united states has now been reelected. [cheering and applauding] >> and this is in addition to all of the local regional lgbt persons that have been elected and a pointed to this wonderful city and the region. * appointed i think they would smile, that they would see that their efforts to make this city much more equitable for everybody has been already accomplished. and like supervisor wiener said, the job is
. he is now telling congress that the u.s. government will reach its borrowing limit by next monday, the 31st. remember how much fun the last debt ceiling fight was? well, that news comes as president obama rushes home to washington, cutting short his hawaiian vacation in order to resume talks on the fiscal cliff. there are just five days remaining to strike a deal. we'll get to all that in a moment, but first, we begin with a massive winter storm that made holiday travel miserable for millions of americans, including me! winter storm euclid -- what, are we naming snowstorms now? euclid. you can lid? well, euclid blanketed much of the eastern half of the country yesterday, dropping blizzard-like conditions and record snowfall in the midwest, and by late afternoon, euclid moved northeast, bringing traffic to a standstill, forcing the cancellation of more than 1,500 flights on one of the busiest travel days of the year. the weather channel's mike seidel has more on the massive christmas storm. >> reporter: a major snowstorm has dumped over a foot of snow across parts of the midwest. i
and the republicans in future negotiations. and raised a question of whether anyone can get a governing majority in the house of representatives when it comes to the budget. those are really serious matters. now it does go to the senate where harry reid and mcconnell can try to come to some, you know, functional su render for republicans and kick the cannon a lot of other issues and see if that can pass in the next ten days am buts that still has to pass the house. and so i think the chances of backing off of the cliff are higher than they ever have been. >> you know, i listened to some of these recalcitrant house republicans today, mark. and they were saying, i was to the going to vote for a tax increase when my constituent was never have gone along with that. >> well, i think there are two realities, here, judy. first of all there's a lot of republicans, more than a few democrats who are terrified of one thing, that's being primary, primary opponent without going to run on your right if you are a republican. on your left if you are a democrat. it's really become a problem for republicans. beca
. that includes those budget cuts for most government agencies, the sequester. that may happen at least in the short term. it doesn't seem to be on the table now. also, the medicare doc fix. we don't know for sure if that's going to be in this deal or not. a lot of other pieces still on the table and in limbo for now. >> okay. lisa desjardins, we'll be watching with you, thanks. >>> as you may have guessed, uncertainty over the fiscal cliff is having a ripple effect from washington to wall street. u.s. stocks ended the session in the red on friday for the fifth straight day. a triple-digit loss for the dow, that tumbled 158 points. the nasdaq lost almost 26 points while the s&p 500 shed almost 16 points. >>> in washington, each side of the aisle is pleading its case directly it the taxpayer. both the president and the republicans talking about the fiscal cliff in their weekly addresses. the president said yesterday he was modestly optimistic about a deal, but here he seems to hint at his own plan b if the senate can't reach a deal. >> if an agreement isn't reached on time, then i'll urg
to trim the size and scope of government, whether it was the bush tax cuts a decade ago or whether it was the debate over the debility ceiling just over a year ago is going to likely end up as an effort to expand the size and scope of government. that's something that can only happen in washington. >> eric: both of those guys make very good points. a lot of people are asking why would you say go over the fiscal cliff? i have a lot to lose if we go over the fiscal cliff. my taxes would go up. i'm heavily invested in the stock market. it will probably take a big hit. but in the long run, the only way to solve america's debt problem -- we have a debt problem. we have a very bad debt problem. we're on our way to $20 trillion in debt, maybe 25 in the next five to ten years. the only way to fix that is go over the fiscal cliff 'cause clearly democrats don't want to cut spending. they'll have to be forced into that and the only way that happens is hit the sequestration, the things that the fiscal cliff will bring of the that's why. i'll take the medicine, the pain now for a healthier econ
like contractors that have been contracting with the federal government to replace the shuttle? and could you comment on where the commercial space ports of the future will be located? >> well, for suborbital manned spaceflight, they can use any airport with a 12,000 foot runway. branson is considering doing it in an isolated place in new mexico. i tried to talk him into doing it in a place where there is an ocean and something worth looking. at any rate, his plan to put spaceports in five or six different countries, he wants to do one or you can let people see the northern lights during your space flight. so he has some really neat ideas about where it could be done. when you look at where funds are available for a space port, there is one planned in dubai. there is not one affordable enough to fly into orbit, so i suggest that we had better solve that problem and then think about what a space port would look like. >> your thoughts on using model aviation as a funnel for youth to get into aircraft engineering, because your friends at the faa are trying to lump us then with the
no higher rates on the rich, no tax hikes on anyone. based on an ideology that calls on government to be as small as possible. its roots are as old as american, but the main spokesman is this man, grover norquist, president of americans for tax reform. norquist's pledge signed by almost all republicans in congress forbids them from raising taxes ever under any circumstances. things come to a head in the summer of 2011. republicans demand the government reduce its deficit as a condition for raising the debt ceiling. without a deal, the u.s. would lose its ability to borrow money. they deploy tactics that nearly shut down the government and ultimately cost america its aaa credit rating for the first time in history. but in a last-minute compromise, both sides agree to a trillion dollars in spending cuts up front and another $1.2 trillion in cuts to be decided by a special super committee. but a poison pill was attached. if the super committee can't reach a deal, automatic across the board cuts known as the sequester would go into effect january 2013 at the exact moment when the bush
to be the police chief accuses the government of carrying out massacres of innocent civilians and he says the military is nothing but armed gangs that kill. he says is he defecting to, quote, join the people's revolution. and the recovery in the housing market remains on pace. home prices rose 4.3% in october over last year, that is it the biggest percentage increase in more than two years. near record low mortgage rates and fewer foreclosures are helping spur sale which is in turn is boosting prices. and the world's longest high speed rail line is up and running and it's in, where else, china. the 1428 mile line spans more than half the country linking the capital of beijing to the southern chinese bloom city. trains will run at 186 miles per hour. >>> and civil rights icon nelson mandela has been discharged from a south africa hospital. 94-year-old former president will continue treatment at his home. he was hospitalized with a lung infection on december 8th. one week later, he had surgery to remove gallstones. i'm sure everyone's pleased to hear that he's doing well. >> thanks so much
don't think it's a foregone conclusion that they're going to be steam-rollering with big government. voters also passed prop 39, which closed a corporate tax option of -- some would call it a loophole to pay a lower tax. that brings another $1 billion into the state budget. and for -- >> some of that's earmarked, though. >> for the first five years, half of it is earmarked for green jobs, environmentsal things, and it looks like the legislature wants to put that into energy retrofits for schools. but going forward, it's not earmarked money. >> so, the supermajority and the potential budget surpluses on the horizon a year or two out, does this give jerry brown like a new life politically? does he -- you know, what does he do with it. >> a new life, but not a blank check, maybe, yeah. >> had he lost, he might not have run again for governor, and that would have been a huge rejection of everything he had argued for, that you could bring sanity to the process, people are reasonable, they'll find a middle ground. all that would have been in ruins. and i think now -- and obviously, it dep
. where some listing agency, and the federal government approves listing agencies, has looked at all the test results and then issue as a report that says if this piece of equipment, whatever it is -- like this wonderful new connector -- is used -- >> cupeling. >> excuse me. is used in accordance with the following specific requirement, it will meet the requirements of the following. in other words, the listing says if you do it the right way, we can assure that you this will meet some standards. right? is that more or less correct? >> correct >> and the third part of that -- we have testing, listing. and then the third part is approval. and approval is something that's done at the local level here at the city of san francisco. we typically approve a listed product. like this kupling. occasionally we have somebody come forward saying, look, i have the listing. we say, that's great. but we don't allow to you use it here in san francisco. either the local law doesn't allow that kind of product or that kind of material, or we don't think it's safe. and i could give you some examples of
played the game." arnold, you have struck our hearts and minds. today, your government, your fellow citizens are going to strike the gold medal for you. congratulations. [applause] >> ladies and gentlemen, please remain seated for the unveiling and presentation of the congressional gold medal by members of united states congress. [applause] ladies and gentlemen, mr. arnold palmer. [applause] >> thank you. mr. speaker, members of congress, reverend clergy, ladies and gentlemen. this is not my first time, so bear with me a little bit. i prepare this wonderful occasion, and i thought about what a thrill it was last time i had the opportunity to address congress in these halls. that was in 1990. on the 100th anniversary of the birthday of president and general dwight eisenhower. i was fortunate enough to have had a warm and rewarding french ship -- friendship with the president, and the last of his years were wonderful. we enjoyed a little golf and a lot of fun. it was a great honor to be able to be with him, a great american. he was that. it was a pleasure for me to spend some time wit
countries toward democracy and market economies are generally about governance and economics. frankly, there is the third key question as well which is christians, the christians and the city's of levittown build societies together? and the kurds and sinise? it will be at the question. this is the questions of how different sex and religious treatises relate to each other, one of the central questions of the 21st century. that is one of the reasons we need a really robust field of interfaith cooperation helping to make vague the bridge of cooperation rather than a barrier of division or bomb of destruction. how do we do this well. you can see this as a robust discourse within the field of education reform or poverty alleviation or in car rentals and bill read is not about doing it. it's about doing it well. part of what we have done is look through the social science research of the last ten years and religious diversity whether it is work by robert putnam at harvard or princeton or pew and galloped and brown and all the social science research and ask the question of effectiveness. w
. this morning the pope pardoned his former butler, in prison for leaking private vatican governments. he was sentenced to 18 months in prison for aggravated theft in october. the high-profile scandal became known as vatileaks. the pope personally visited gabriele before confirming his pardon. >>> reunited with his family, john hammer was released yesterday partly thanks to work from u.s. senator bill nelson. hammer was imprisoned on a questionable charge after police found him with an antique shotgun. his parents say u.s. officials told him it was okay to cross the border with that gun. you see it there. mexican officials accused him of violating their laws. >> spokeswoman for margaret thatcher says the former british prime minister is doing fine after surgery. 87-year-old thatcher is recuperating after having a growth removed from her bladder. she has cut back dramatically on public appearances after suffering a series of mild strokes. >>> now to russia, where the country is moving to ban u.s. citizens from adopting russian children and already passed one house of parliament. michael mc
is regulated by the government as a food product, so the levels of toxins and carcinogens are kept to a bare minimum. that's why doctors in sweden recommend snus to people who simply can't stop smoking even though it's clearly an addictive substance. they're following a controversial medical practice called harm reduction. and groups like the royal college of physicians are pushing it for smokers, saying that less hazardous products like snus "can save millions of lives." >> at this point in time, i cannot say that these products are safer. >> but in the u.s., health officials like karla sneegas don't like the idea of harm reduction, where you use another tobacco product to fight smoking. she runs the anti-tobacco program for the state of indiana. >> i think that these products are going to end up leading to dual use of cigarettes and smokeless tobacco products. and we have no idea whatsoever what is the outcome, what's the health impact, of someone not quitting and using both products. >> in other words, you're saying that if they do that, it could end up being more harmful. >> it could end
. essentially the government would be forced to buy milk at double the average cost. that could push the price for a gallon of milk to over $7. >>> today is the second and final round of voting on a referendum for egypt's new draft constitution. it comes one day after clashes in alexandria between supporters and opponents of president mohamed morsi. the constitution which passed a first phase of voting last week has sparked concerns over the power it creates for morsi. >>> "gangnam style" by the south korean rapper is the first video in the history of the internet to surpass one billion views. if you haven't seen it yet, here is a look at what you've been missing. [ "gangnam style" ] ♪ >> is there anyone really who hasn't seen that? is there anyone left? it's amazing. boy. i love that music. >>> we have much more ahead in the next hour of "cnn saturday morning" which starts after a short break. keep it here. and cut! very good. people are always asking me how we make these geico adverts. so we're taking you behind the scenes. this coffee cup, for example, is computer animated. it's not real.
to others across the country. in france. the government has thrown out a plan to tax the country's ultra-rich at a 75 percent rate. the tax was one of the president's campaign promises. however, a consititutional council says the amount was excessive. some felt that the tax would not solve the country's fiscal problems. and would only push wealthy people out of the country. france's most famous actor, gerard dep-ard-doo, recently moved to belgium to avoid taxes. meanwhile, unemployment in france rose in november for the 19th straight month. coming up on kron 4 news weekend, ??is "mcdreamy" trading in his scalpel for a coffee apron? we'll be checking out all things hollywood with all today's entertainment news in just a few minutes. music) >> from billie holiday. open >> she is so good she is going be playing at the new year's eve at the razz room >> it is great to have you. and i love hearing your music you can do all types of great sounds. can you tell me who inspired you? >> i started loving the little rascals and i also loved darla. [laughter] . i thought that you were going to say th
it this morning in a bid to end the escalating civil war after a government air strike on a bakery in central syria killed more than 60 people as they were waiting for bread. more than 40,000 people have died since the conflict began in march of 2011. >>> idaho senator michael kra poe is apologizing it to ms. family and constituents after arrested and charged with driving under the influence. he was stopped in virginia for running a red light on sunday. he failed sobriety tests registering a blood alcohol level over the legal limit. the senator who was eye mormon has said in the past he does not drink alcohol as his religion prohibits it. >>> turning to wall street, kayla is at athe new york stock exchange. good morning. >> the stock mark has tracked the progress of the fiscal cliff talks or lack thereof. falling on news of no deal and now at a relative standstill, still the major markets were up and the s&p is up up 13% for the year. later this week we expect more signs of economic improvement especially in the housing market. home price data comes out on wednesday. new homes sales data come
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 52 (some duplicates have been removed)

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